Solid Brass 1-1/4"W x 1-1/2"H Rectangular Recessed Ring Pulls

Commonly called "campaign hardware", this line of gorgeous recessed brass hardware serves both to beautify and to protect your furniture and surrounding items. The term "campaign hardware" derives from the 18th and 19th centuries, when English officers demanded high-quality, portable furniture while on military marches. The recessed hardware and brass corners allowed furniture to nestle together in a compact stack, and prevented scratches while stowed in the back of a bumpy horse-drawn wagon. Once unpacked and in the tent, however, the furniture served as a beautiful reminder of home.Technical Details:Solid brass recessed ring pull.Polished finish.Dimensions: 1-1/4"W x 1-1/2"H. Total depth: 7/16".Inside diameter of ring pull: 11/16".Projection from surface (if surface-mounted): approximately 1/8".Can be surface-mounted or mortised flush with the surface.Sold singly.Installation and Care Instructions:Measure and mark hole fixings with a pencil, preferably onto a strip of masking tape that will help to steady the drill.Drill a pilot hole as a lead for the wood screw.Remember, the included wood screws are made of brass so never overtighten or attempt to drive without a pilot hole, as this can cause them to break off in the wood.Occasional use of a damp cloth, and the use of quality wax polish is recommended to maintain the lustre.

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